Posts Tagged ‘wellness’

Ionization And Anions

Thursday, June 26th, 2014

Negative ions are called anions. Negative ions are odorless, tasteless, and invisible molecules that we inhale in abundance in certain environments — in a shower or after a thunderstorm. When you breath them in, your mood is boosted and your pain reduced.

In the Park After a Rainstorm

In the Park After a Rainstorm

After The Rain Ionization Song

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Vegetarian Diet Less Healthy

Sunday, April 20th, 2014

A new study shows a vegetarian diet is less healthy than a well balanced diet. (More on “Humans Are Omnivores”)

Our study has shown that Austrian adults who consume a vegetarian diet are less healthy (in terms of cancer, allergies, and mental health disorders), have a lower quality of life, and also require more medical treatment. Therefore, a continued strong public health program for Austria is required in order to reduce the health risk due to nutritional factors. Moreover, our results emphasize the necessity of further studies in Austria, for a more in- depth analysis of the health effects of different dietary habits.

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Heavy Metals In Your Diet

Thursday, January 23rd, 2014

Heavy metals can either be an essential part of your diet or toxic and deadly. For instance, iron is needed for blood; however, men can build up toxic levels of iron as they grow older.

Living organisms require varying amounts of “heavy metals”. Iron, cobalt, copper, manganese, molybdenum, and zinc are required by humans. Excessive levels can be damaging to the organism. Other heavy metals such as mercury, plutonium, and lead are toxic metals and their accumulation over time in the bodies of animals can cause serious illness. Certain elements that are normally toxic are, for certain organisms or under certain conditions, beneficial. Examples include vanadium, tungsten, and even cadmium.

Heavy metal toxicity can result in damaged or reduced mental and central nervous function, lower energy levels, and damage to blood composition, lungs, kidneys, liver, and other vital organs. Long-term exposure may result in slowly progressing physical, muscular, and neurological degenerative processes that mimic Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, muscular dystrophy, and multiple sclerosis. Allergies are not uncommon, and repeated long-term contact with some metals (or their compounds) may cause cancer.
– Wikipedia

Do not eat:

  • Shark
  • Swordfish
  • King Mackerel
  • Tilefish

Nearly all fish and shellfish contain traces of mercury… some fish and shellfish contain higher levels of mercury that may harm an unborn baby or young child’s developing nervous system. The risks from mercury in fish and shellfish depend on the amount of fish and shellfish eaten and the levels of mercury in the fish and shellfish.
– The FDA of the United States of America

Heavy Metals Song from the album Food For Thought

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Is Kale Bad For You?

Sunday, January 12th, 2014

In an article for The New York Times, Jennifer Berman reports on the problems with kale:

“Imagine my shock, then, at my last physical, when my doctor told me I had hypothyroidism, common in women over 40. When I got home I looked up the condition on the Internet and found a list of foods to avoid. Kale, which I juiced every morning, tops the list, followed by broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, Brussels sprouts and collard greens — the cruciferous vegetables I consumed in large quantities because they are thought to prevent cancer, which runs in my family. And flax — as in the seeds — high in omega 3’s, that I sprinkled on cereal and blended in strawberry almond milk smoothies. Also forbidden: almonds and strawberries, not to mention soy, peaches, peanuts, corn, radishes, rutabaga and spinach.”

This is based on a study by Oregon State:

“Very high intakes of cruciferous vegetables…have been found to cause hypothyroidism (insufficient thyroid hormone) in animals (68). There has been one case report of an 88-year-old woman developing severe hypothyroidism and coma following consumption of an estimated 1.0 to 1.5 kg/day of raw bok choy for several months. Two mechanisms have been identified to explain this effect. The hydrolysis of some glucosinolates found in cruciferous vegetables (e.g., progoitrin) may yield a compound known as goitrin, which has been found to interfere with thyroid hormone synthesis. The hydrolysis of another class of glucosinolates, known as indole glucosinolates, results in the release of thiocyanate ions, which can compete with iodine for uptake by the thyroid gland. Increased exposure to thiocyanate ions from cruciferous vegetable consumption or, more commonly, from cigarette smoking, does not appear to increase the risk of hypothyroidism unless accompanied by iodine deficiency. One study in humans found that the consumption of 150 g/day (5 oz/day) of cooked Brussels sprouts for four weeks had no adverse effects on thyroid function.”

Q:What should you do?
A: Avoid juicing with kale and most importantly cook kale.

NPR advises:
“The goitergenics properties of kale become dramatically lessened when kale — or any other cruciferous vegetable — is cooked. (Other veggies in this category include: broccoli, brussel sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, collard greens, kohlrabi, mustard, rutabaga, turnips, bok choy, and Chinese cabbage. Arugula, horse radish, radish, wasabi and watercress are also cruciferous vegetables.)”

More On Edible Plants

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Turkey Seasoning with Healthy Herbs

Tuesday, December 24th, 2013

Growing some herbs on a window sill is a good way to keep eating healthy all year round. When it comes to Thanksgiving and Christmas, you can increase the health benefits of your food by adding herbs to just about everything you serve.

Rosemary, thyme and sage make an excellent combination when preparing your turkey. Finely dice the herbs for inclusion in the stuffing mix. Then, create a rub for application prior to cooking. Throughout the cooking process, sprinkle herbs over the top.

You can also add fresh herbs to your other dishes. Add some parsley to mashed potatoes. Add some basil to your vegetable dishes. Keep some aloe on-hand in case of kitchen burns.

VIDEO: Turkey Seasoning Healthy Herbs — Rosemary, Thyme, Sage.mp4

 

Herbs for Turkey Seasoning -- Rosemary, Thyme, Sage

Herbs for Turkey Seasoning — Rosemary, Thyme, Sage

More on Foraging for Food in the Winter

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