Posts Tagged ‘eating’

10 banned foods Americans should stop eating right now

Monday, January 26th, 2015

Remember: There are NO known health risks to GMO’s.

10 Banned Foods to Avoid

Are you eating food that’s already banned in other countries but is still allowed to poison and kill Americans? Learn these pernicious ingredients and common foods through this infographic. Use the embed code to share it on your website.

 

Healthy Eating

Monday, February 24th, 2014

1. discover fast ways to cook
Cook fresh or frozen vegetables in the microwave for a quick-and-easy dish to add to any meal. Steam green beans, carrots, or broccoli in a bowl with a small amount of water in the microwave for a quick side dish.

2. be ahead of the game
Cut up a batch of bell peppers, carrots, or broccoli. Pre-package them to use when time is limited. You can enjoy them on a salad, with hummus, or in a veggie wrap.

3. choose vegetables rich in color
Brighten your plate with vegetables that are red, orange, or dark green. They are full of vitamins and minerals. Try acorn squash, cherry tomatoes, sweet potatoes, or collard greens. They not only taste great but also are good for you, too.

4. check the freezer aisle
Frozen vegetables are quick and easy to use and are just as nutritious as fresh veggies. Try adding frozen corn, peas, green beans, spinach, or sugar snap peas to some of your favorite dishes or eat as a side dish.

5. make your garden salad glow with color
Brighten your salad by using colorful vegetables such as black beans, sliced red bell peppers, shredded radishes, chopped red cabbage, or watercress. Your salad will not only look good but taste good, too.

Color Me Dumb: Eating Colors

Food For Thought

Medicinal Plants

Monday, November 25th, 2013

DESPITE INCREASES in the production of synthetic drugs, natural plant drug materials are still economically significant in the united States, and large quantities are harvested in the southern Appalachian region each year for medicinal purposes. A 1962 survey of 328,599,000 new prescriptions written in the U. S. showed that 25 percent were for drugs from natural plant products. However, during the past 30 to 50 years, fewer and fewer people have been harvesting wild lants in Appalachia, which is the principal American source, mainly because of families emigrating to more prosperous areas. Between 1950 and 1960, the southern Appalachian region lost through emigration more than a million people, nearly a fifth of the population. Increases in local blue-collar employment opportunities, a growing reluctance to work in the fields and forests, scarcity of some plants because of over-collecting, and land-use changes have also reduced the natural plant harvests for drug materials.

To locate, collect, and prepare plants for market is time-consuming work. Some collectors do not know all the useful plant species and the best markets for them. This manual was prepared to help collectors identify, collect, and handle plants, plant parts, and pollen.

Not all the plants listed are marketable at all times; so the collector would do well to write to one of the collecting houses listed (table 1) for prices and information about market demand. Buyers of such material are helpful in providing other useful information on collecting.

Guide To Edible Plants

Getting Enough Calcium

Thursday, November 7th, 2013

Most Americans are developing a vitamin D deficiency. Calcium intake goes hand-in-hand with Vitamin D.

Your body needs calcium to build strong bones when you are young and to keep bones strong as you get older. Everyone needs calcium, but it’s especially important for women and girls.

Girls ages 9 to 18 need 1,300 mg (milligrams) of calcium every day.
Women ages 19 to 50 need 1,000 mg of calcium every day.
Women over age 50 need 1,200 mg of calcium every day.

Calcium can help prevent osteoporosis (weak bones).
One in 2 women and 1 in 4 men over the age of 50 will break a bone because of osteoporosis (“os-tee-oh-puh-ROH-sis”). Some people don’t know they have osteoporosis until they break a bone.

Calcium helps to keep your bones strong and less likely to break.

Q: How can I get enough calcium?
A: There are 2 easy ways to get your calcium:

1. Eat foods with calcium every day, such as:
Fat-free or low-fat (1%) milk, yogurt, and cheese
Broccoli, spinach, and other green leafy vegetables
Tofu with added calcium
Soy-based drinks (soymilk) with added calcium
Orange juice with added calcium
2. Take a calcium pill every day. You can choose a pill that has only calcium or a multivitamin with calcium. Let your doctor know you are taking extra calcium.

Healthy Eating Tips

Friday, October 25th, 2013

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services suggests:

A healthy diet can help protect you from heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and some types of cancer. Get tips on how to eat healthy on a budget, plan ahead to save time, and eat healthy away from home.